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For the last 27 years, Theo Jansen – a Dutch kinetic sculpture – has been creating new forms of life out of plastic pipes. His beach creatures, called ‘Strandbeest,’ get their energy from the wind.
The “DNA code” they share, says Jansen, is the proportions between their spine and the pipes that make up their feet. These numbers mean they can be reproduced quickly and effectively using 3D printers.
Theo Jansen has become famous for his wind-powered millipede creatures made from recycled plastic. Without reproducing the master’s giant proportions, several DIY models celebrate this art of movement. Review.
His “beach creatures” have been proliferating on the coasts since 1990. Dutch physicist artist Theo Jansen has taken kinetic art out of the galleries to breathe life into odd beasts, made of intricate gears that leverage the wind with highly refined mechanics. With an insect’s delicate crawl, the Strandbeests, made of plastic bottles and waste, Image result for giant kinetic creaturedevelop extraordinary mechanical properties. Jansen took inspiration from theories of evolution when he designed his bestiary. His Animaris ambulate across several beaches around the world, as long as the environment is windy, make stops in museums, as at Palais de Tokyo in 2015 and currently in Chicago. Makers and lovers of this eminently DIY art have been inspired to create their own models, perhaps on a smaller scale, but just as mobile.Image result for giant kinetic creature
The rustic elements of fabrication, PVC tubing, sails, plastic bottles, are ideal for making things from scratch. But before tackling your own Jansen-inspired wind creature, it’s necessary to understand the mechanism behind the legs of the beast, in order to make the best choice of energy, and therefore, motion power.
Legs: fixed figureImage result for giant kinetic creature
Jansen’s beach creatures owe their natural gait to the artist’s mechanical algorithm, based on “eleven holy numbers” (which he explains in detail on his site). If the mechanics look complex, it’s because several leg mechanisms overlap. It’s easier to follow the tutorials starting with a single mechanism…

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